8. Keeping Christ in Ministry by John H. Harrison

 Unlike a previous review, I enjoyed that the scripture in this book was printed out, and I didn't have to go and look up each verse reference in my Bible. The author quotes scripture after scripture that spoke of Jesus as Prophet, Priest, King, Warrior, Light, Shepherd, Servant, Teacher, Creator, Brother, and Immanuel. It was like a topical study on the character of Jesus, and how we can reflect His character in ministry. 

But that is really all it is: a topical Bible study about Jesus. If it had been titled The Character of Christ, I would not have been disappointed, but the title and introduction build up my hope that it would be more about the different approaches to ministry--especially in America--that are "suspect at best, and unbiblical at worst" (Kindle Locations 36-48). 

In the introduction, the author promises: 
The final chapter presents an approach to ministry that is based on the perspective presented in this book. It illustrates how people’s unique creation by God— their passions, personality, and spiritual gifts— enables them to participate in the ministry of Jesus in a unique way. This chapter also explains the role of the “ministry mentor” in helping people and provides an example of an overall approach.
Harbison, John H.. Keeping Christ in Ministry (Kindle Locations 99-102). Kirkdale Press.  

I came to the end of that chapter and said, "That's it? Also, his discussion of passions, personality, and spiritual gifts are something I teach on, and it a very basic regurgitation of the S.H.A.P.E. (Spiritual Gifts, Heart Passions, Abilities, Personality, Experience) already developed by others many years ago and doesn't really contribute anything new to the dialogue.

While I wholeheartedly agree that much of the church has resorted to methodology over theology, I do not think this book does much to counteract that trend. 



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