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12. Institutes of the Christian Religion: Book 2 by John Calvin


I have already reviewed the Institutes, in general (see HERE). 
This is what Calvin says Book 2 is about: 
Under the Occasion of Redemption, the Fall is considered not only in a general way, but also specially in its effects. Hence the first four chapters treat of original sin, free will, the corruption of human nature, and the operation of God in the heart. The fifth chapter contains a refutation of the arguments usually urged in support of free will. 

The subject of redemption may be reduced to five particular heads:
 
I. The character of him in whom salvation for lost man must be sought, Chap. 6. 
II. How he was manifested to the world, namely, in a twofold manner. First, under the Law. Here the Decalogue is expounded, and some other points relating to the law discussed, Chap. 7 and 8. 
Secondly, under the Gospel. Here the resemblance and difference of the two dispensations are considered, Chap. 9, 10, 11. 
III. What kind of person Christ was, and behaved to be, in order to perform the office of Mediator—viz. God and man in one person, Chap. 12, 13, 14. 
IV. For what end he was sent into the world by the Father. Here Christ’s prophetical, kingly, and priestly offices are considered, Chap. 15. 

V. In what way, or by what successive steps, Christ fulfilled the office of our Redeemer, Chap. 16. Here are considered his crucifixion, death, burial, descent to hell, resurrection, ascension to heaven, and seat at the right hand of the Father, together with the practical use of the whole doctrine. Chapter 17 contains an answer to the question, Whether Christ is properly said to have merited the grace of God for us.  
(Calvin, J. (1997). Institutes of the Christian religion. Translation of: Institutio Christianae religionis.; Reprint, with new introd. Originally published: Edinburgh : Calvin Translation Society, 1845-1846. (II). Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.)

I have read what Calvinists believe about free will, but it was nice to read it straight from Calvin. How is he so SURE we don't have free will though? We aren't robots. I just think that there are more important things to do than debate about it though. 

I loved what he said about desiring to obey because the Spirit of God is in us. I bookmarked it, but I lost the bookmark. It was so GOOD! Shoot! Too many pages to wade through to find it.

I loved hearing verse after verse about Christ as our Redeemer. 

Again, I read this, and I think our time would be better spent just reading the Bible over and over to understand all of this rather than reading the musings of a 27 year old. :)

Also, the Librivox recording is FREE! Most of the readers are really good. One lady is on there a lot and quite monotone, but she isn't bad! There is one Scottish guy who is my favorite!!!
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